Things Need Doin'

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We think if we can keep going, keep busy, keep plowing ahead, our conscience won’t have time to catch us because—ha, ha!—we’ll already be long gone. And the reality is this approach actually works. But only for a time. “Life is like the breath,” writes Brother David Steindl-Rast. “We must be able to live in an easy rhythm between give and take. If we cannot learn to live and breathe in this rhythm, we will place ourselves in grave danger.” Maybe even the literal grave.

Because it’s easy for me to chase after the tempting buzz of busy living, I’ve learned to recognize the signs that my addiction has kicked in again. If you lean toward over-scheduled and under-rested, consider these danger signs of a busyness addiction: (via Signs You May be Addicted to Busyness | RELEVANT Magazine)

We think if we can keep going, keep busy, keep plowing ahead, our conscience won’t have time to catch us because—ha, ha!—we’ll already be long gone. And the reality is this approach actually works. But only for a time. “Life is like the breath,” writes Brother David Steindl-Rast. “We must be able to live in an easy rhythm between give and take. If we cannot learn to live and breathe in this rhythm, we will place ourselves in grave danger.” Maybe even the literal grave.

Because it’s easy for me to chase after the tempting buzz of busy living, I’ve learned to recognize the signs that my addiction has kicked in again. If you lean toward over-scheduled and under-rested, consider these danger signs of a busyness addiction: (via Signs You May be Addicted to Busyness | RELEVANT Magazine)

Filed under relevant magazine christianity busyness addiction busy culture organization

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Here are a few simple steps for becoming more of an Essentialist:

1. Schedule a personal quarterly offsite. Companies invest in quarterly offsite meetings because there is value in rising above day-to-day operations to ask more strategic questions. Similarly, if we want to avoid being tripped up by the trivial, we need to take time once a quarter to think about what is essential and what is nonessential. I have found it helpful to apply the “rule of three”: every three months you take three hours to identify the three things you want to accomplish over the next three months.

2. Rest well to excel. K. Anders Ericsson found in “The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance” that a significant difference between good performers and excellent performers was the number of hours they spent practicing. The finding was popularized by Malcolm Gladwell as the “10,000 hour rule.” What few people realize is that the second most highly correlated factor distinguishing the good from the great is how much they sleep. As Ericsson pointed out, top performing violinists slept more than less accomplished violinists: averaging 8.6 hours of sleep every 24 hours.

3. Add expiration dates on new activities. Traditions have an important role in building relationships and memories. However, not every new activity has to become a tradition. The next time you have a successful event, enjoy it, make the memory, and move on.

4. Say no to a good opportunity every week. Just because we are invited to do something isn’t a good enough reason to do it. Feeling empowered by essentialism, one executive turned down the opportunity to serve on a board where she would have been expected to spend 10 hours a week for the next 2-3 years. She said she felt totally liberated when she turned it down. It’s counterintuitive to say no to good opportunities, but if we don’t do it then we won’t have the space to figure out what we really want to invest our time in.

(via Why We Humblebrag About Being Busy - Greg McKeown - Harvard Business Review)

Here are a few simple steps for becoming more of an Essentialist:

1. Schedule a personal quarterly offsite. Companies invest in quarterly offsite meetings because there is value in rising above day-to-day operations to ask more strategic questions. Similarly, if we want to avoid being tripped up by the trivial, we need to take time once a quarter to think about what is essential and what is nonessential. I have found it helpful to apply the “rule of three”: every three months you take three hours to identify the three things you want to accomplish over the next three months.

2. Rest well to excel. K. Anders Ericsson found in “The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance” that a significant difference between good performers and excellent performers was the number of hours they spent practicing. The finding was popularized by Malcolm Gladwell as the “10,000 hour rule.” What few people realize is that the second most highly correlated factor distinguishing the good from the great is how much they sleep. As Ericsson pointed out, top performing violinists slept more than less accomplished violinists: averaging 8.6 hours of sleep every 24 hours.

3. Add expiration dates on new activities. Traditions have an important role in building relationships and memories. However, not every new activity has to become a tradition. The next time you have a successful event, enjoy it, make the memory, and move on.

4. Say no to a good opportunity every week. Just because we are invited to do something isn’t a good enough reason to do it. Feeling empowered by essentialism, one executive turned down the opportunity to serve on a board where she would have been expected to spend 10 hours a week for the next 2-3 years. She said she felt totally liberated when she turned it down. It’s counterintuitive to say no to good opportunities, but if we don’t do it then we won’t have the space to figure out what we really want to invest our time in.

(via Why We Humblebrag About Being Busy - Greg McKeown - Harvard Business Review)

Filed under busy culture productivity essentialism advice mindfulness

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studdiction:

BULLET JOURNALING 

Watch the original video here ( x )
Before I saw this video, I always kept a book for my homework. I use grid paper and it’s perfect for BJ… Heh. After watching this, it helped me to start developing a system I’m currently satisfied with. 

To-do apps don’t work with me. It always just sits on my screen with a notification and swiping something doesn’t feel as satisfying as crossing it out victoriously with a pen. ^_^

  1. LEGENDS ( you can also do it like thisHelps you quickly figure out what certain tasks are at a glance. The colours are for my spiraldexes which I will not be discussing unless you guys request it. c:
  2. Pages This is basically what my pages look like. I write the numbers at the lower corners.I also added sticky notes for extra stuff like memorizing my moral definitions. :p
  3. Calendar  ( x ) If you watch the video, you’re supposed to list out the dates but I prefer both, so I draw a calendar and paste it in my book and list out all the really appointments/stuff I have to do in my drawn calendar and some not-important-but-still-worth-noting notes in my list-calendar.
  4. Index Just write down the pages as shown in the video. Pretty simple. 
  5. Other things you can include: I also stick some motivational images on the last page and stuff like that. Spiraldexes can be fun but they tend to be a little time consuming to draw or at least, I can seem to use them effectively. :c
  1. Have pages especially for grocery lists/ grades/ etc. 
  2. Page full of favourite recipes
  3. Stick an envelope at the back cover and fill it with motivational inspiration!
  4. Stick printables ( x ) ( x ) ( x ) ( x )
  5. Start a goal/wishlist!

 Good luck! :* 

(via under-a-pile-of-papers)